Heel Ulcer

Heel Ulcer

Decubitus Ulcer is a breakdown of skin and/or subcutaneous tissue that is deprived of adequate blood supply because of unrelieved pressure on a bony prominence. There are four stages of decubitus ulcers: Stage I - Unbroken, pink or reddened skin; Stage II - A loss of skin involving the epidermis and/or dermis; looks like an abrasion, blister or shallow crater; Stage III - A loss of skin involving damage to the subcutaneous tissue and may extend to, but not through, the underlying tendons and muscles; may have necrotic tissue; looks like a deep crater with or without undermining of adjacent tissue; Stage IV - A loss of skin involving extensive destruction, necrotic tissue, black eschar or damage to muscle, bone or supporting structures such as tendons or joint capsules. Heel Ulcers are a very common and hazardous condition in bed-ridden patients. The weight and pressure exerted on the heel bone (calcaneous) can lead to a heel ulcer in as little as a few hours in bed-ridden patients. If left untreated or unsupervised, ulcers can lead to serious infection, gangrene and even amputation. This condition is especially hazardous for diabetic patients with poor circulation and insensitive feet.

Filter:
Show All
Support
Stabilize
Immobilize